Summer Vegetable Frittata

I love making frittatas. They are the answer to every single food serving conundrum:

What do I feed our out of town guests?

Frittata!

Eek!  It’s the end of the month and my refrigerator is practically empty!

Frittata!

Where else can I attempt to hide this excess of zucchini?

Frittata!

Making a frittata is as easy as making scrambled eggs. You move the eggs around a bit but before they are cooked through entirely, you sprinkle some cheese on top and put the whole pan under the broiler. The cheese gets all melty and the whole thing puffs up and it looks ten times more appetizing than a pan of scrambled eggs.  Since you finish cooking the egg mixture under the broiler, it all comes together enough that you can cut neat little wedges to serve it instead of heaping a glob of eggs on your plate.  Even if you’re only making it for yourself with end of the month leftovers, it’s still nice if your food actually looks like you want to eat it, don’t you think?

Summer Veg. Fritatta.Pan

Of all of summer’s bountiful gifts, I think that sweet corn is one of the best. Second only to peaches…..and real tomatoes….and piles of fresh basil…..  

Evidently, there are several summer produce items that I would categorize as being my favorite.  I should mention that I have a notorious history of being indecisive, so this should come as no surprise.  Regardless of what your favorite summer treats are, sweet corn definitely deserves a spot right up there near the top of the list!

Before you launch into your “corn does not count as a vegetable” diatribe, I would respectfully request that you put a sock in it.  Much like white potatoes, corn is a starchy vegetable, and that means that yes, it has carbohydrates, but did you know that it also has phytochemicals (specifically lutein, which is good for your eyes) and folate? Is it a nutritional superstar like kale? No, but honestly, what is?  Besides kale, that is?  Listen, I love kale.  I eat a lot of kale.  But I have yet to eat kale in any form that rivaled the incredible goodness of fresh sweet corn.    

Summer Vegetable Frittata

 

This frittata is loaded with corn, carrots, zucchini, and spinach.  It also has some cottage cheese thrown in there which sounds like an odd thing to put in your eggs, but give it a try.  It gets incorporated into the rest of the egg mixture and makes it extra creamy.  Plus, cottage cheese is a great source of calcium.   Often, frittata fillings seem to get soft and the whole thing takes on a uniform texture.  Corn, however, doesn’t turn to mush so it creates a really nice textural contrast to the sauteed vegetables and eggs.   The recipe as written makes 8 wedges in a 12 inch pan, but you could easily halve the recipe and make it in an 8 inch pan instead.  Consider making the whole thing so you have leftovers!  I purposefully made the large frittata and each morning this week I have been popping a wedge (Confession: 2 wedges)  in the oven on warm after my workout and by the time I’m out of the shower and dressed, it’s ready to eat.  

Nutrition:
Makes 8 wedges

Calories: 127     Fat: 7.1 g     Sodium: 178.7 mg     Carbohydrates: 5.8 g    
Fiber: 0.8 g     Sugar: 2.5 g     Protein: 10.3 g

Summer Vegetable Frittata
Serves 8
Summer vegetables and cottage cheese, all mixed up in a puffy, creamy, melty frittata, perfect for breakfast, lunch or dinner.
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Ingredients
  1. 8 large eggs
  2. 2 cups chopped spinach
  3. 1/2 cup shredded carrot
  4. 1/2 cup shredded zucchini
  5. 1 cup blanched corn
  6. 1/2 cup cottage cheese
  7. 2 oz. mozarella cheese
Instructions
  1. 1. Saute carrots, zucchini, corn, and spinach in a 12 inch nonstick pan until zucchini begins to soften and spinach is wilted. Depending on how "nonstick" your pan is, you may want to spray it with a bit of oil or cooking spray first to make sure your eggs don't stick.
  2. 2. Combine eggs and cottage cheese. Mix well to combine and pour mixture over top of vegetables in pan.
  3. 3. With a rubber spatula, carefully move the eggs around in the pan, lifting the sides and bottom to allow uncooked egg to flow underneath.
  4. 4. When the eggs start to cook but are not quite solid, sprinkle the top with cheese and place the entire pan under the broiler. NOTE: if your skillet has a plastic handle, wrap the handle in aluminum foil first.
  5. 5. Leave frittata under the broiler until the eggs puff up and the cheese on top gets melted and starts to brown, about 3 minutes. Watch it carefully so they don't get overcooked!
Notes
  1. Can be served warm or room temperature.
  2. Or, make it ahead of time, cut into individual wedges, and reheat in the oven.
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  1. Katie

    It’s 10 o’clock at night and this makes me wanna frittata. Now.

    • AlwaysDaydreaming

      See? Frittata is perfect any time of day — or night!

  2. Megan

    It’s like you made this one just for me. No onions, tomatoes are only garnish. I’m excited to try it! I’m honestly not sure if my pans can go in the oven, though. How bad is it to just cover it on the stove? I don’t mind an excuse to go pan shopping, and I’m sure mom would be happy to advise.

    • AlwaysDaydreaming

      Most pans are oven safe up to 400 degrees or more. You just put it under the broiler for a few minutes, so you’re not cooking it at a really high temperature for a really long time. However, if you are concerned, I’d check the specifications for your pans. You could could try to cover the pan instead of putting it under the broiler, but you may end up overcooking the bottom. If you try it, report back and let me know how it works.

  3. Megan

    Finally tried this out, with the handle covered in foil under the broiler. The only thing stopping me from digging in immediately is the fear of burning my mouth. It looks and smells awesome :)

    • AlwaysDaydreaming

      That’s what I always did before I got a pan with a completely metal handle and it always worked fine for me. Enjoy breakfast tomorrow!

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